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Principles of ubiquitin and SUMO modifications in DNA repair

Abstract

With the discovery in the late 1980s that the DNA-repair gene RAD6 encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, it became clear that protein modification by ubiquitin conjugation has a much broader significance than had previously been assumed. Now, two decades later, ubiquitin and its cousin SUMO are implicated in a range of human diseases, including breast cancer and Fanconi anaemia, giving fresh momentum to studies focused on the relationships between ubiquitin, SUMO and DNA-repair pathways.

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Figure 1: Schematic diagram of ubiquitin and SUMO modification pathways.
Figure 2: Scheme for XPC and DDB2 ubiquitylation.
Figure 3: The PCNA ubiquitin–SUMO switchboard.
Figure 4: Phosphorylation-dependent RNF8 recruitment.
Figure 5: Hypothetical model for SUMO-driven protein-complex formation.

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Acknowledgements

We thank A. Buchberger, S. Müller and members of the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry for discussions. S.J. is supported by the Max Planck Society, the Centre for Integrated Protein Science Munich, the Deutsche Krebshilfe and the RUBICON Network of Excellence.

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Correspondence should be addressed to S.J. (Jentsch@biochem.mpg.de).

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Bergink, S., Jentsch, S. Principles of ubiquitin and SUMO modifications in DNA repair. Nature 458, 461–467 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07963

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