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Competition between the pseudogap and superconductivity in the high-Tc copper oxides

Abstract

In a classical Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer superconductor, pairing and coherence of electrons are established simultaneously below the critical transition temperature (Tc), giving rise to a gap in the electronic energy spectrum. In the high-Tc copper oxide superconductors, however, a pseudogap1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 extends above Tc. The relationship between the pseudogap and superconductivity is one of the central issues in this field9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17. Spectral gaps arising from pairing precursors are qualitatively similar to those caused by competing electronic states, rendering a standard approach to their analysis inconclusive10,11,12,13,14,15,16. The issue can be settled, however, by studying the correlation between the weights associated with the pseudogap and superconductivity spectral features. Here we report a study of two spectral weights using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The weight of the superconducting coherent peak increases away from the node following the trend of the superconducting gap, but starts to decrease in the antinodal region. This striking non-monotonicity reveals the presence of a competing state. We demonstrate a direct correlation, for different values of momenta and doping, between the loss in the low-energy spectral weight arising from the opening of the pseudogap and a decrease in the spectral weight associated with superconductivity. We therefore conclude that the pseudogap competes with the superconductivity by depleting the spectral weight available for pairing.

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Figure 1: Temperature dependence of the spectral weight in the superconducting and pseudogap states of overdoped Bi2201 ( T c = 29 K).
Figure 2: Momentum dependence of the coherent spectral weight in overdoped, optimally doped and underdoped Bi2201 samples.
Figure 3: Momentum dependence of the magnitudes of spectral gap and the coherent and pseudogap spectral weights in overdoped, optimally doped and underdoped Bi2201 samples.
Figure 4: The momentum and doping evolution of the coherent and pseudogap spectral weights and the effective region of the superconducting quasiparticles.

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Acknowledgements

We thank A. J. Millis, C. Varma and H. M. Fretwell for discussions. This work was supported by Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. The Ames Laboratory is operated for the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, by Iowa State University under contract no. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

Author Contributions T.K., R.K. and A.K. designed the experiment. T.K. and T.T. grew the high-quality single crystals. T.K. acquired the experimental data and T.K. and A.K. performed the data analysis. T.K., A.K. and J.S. wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Takeshi Kondo or Adam Kaminski.

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This file contains Supplementary Methods, Supplementary Data, Supplementary Table 1, Supplementary Figures S1-S6 with Legends and Supplementary References (PDF 1180 kb)

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Kondo, T., Khasanov, R., Takeuchi, T. et al. Competition between the pseudogap and superconductivity in the high-Tc copper oxides. Nature 457, 296–300 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature07644

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