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Mechanisms of drug inhibition of signalling molecules

Nature volume 441, pages 457462 (25 May 2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The emergence of tumour-specific, molecularly targeted agents signifies a paradigm shift in cancer therapy, with less reliance on drugs that non-discriminately kill tumour and host cells. Although the diversity of targets giving rise to this new generation of anticancer drugs has expanded, many challenges persist in the design of effective treatment regimens. The complex interplay of signal-transduction pathways further complicates the customization of cancer treatments to target single mechanisms. However, despite uncertainty over precise or dominant mechanisms of action, especially for compounds targeting multiple gene products, emerging agents are producing significant therapeutic advances against a broad range of human cancers.

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank D. Leopold, R. Herrera and S. Eck for their thoughtful comments. We would like to express special gratitude to J. Ohren for his generous provision of Figs 2 and 3 as well as helpful feedback.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Pfizer Global Research and Development, Michigan Laboratories, 2800 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA.

    • Judith S. Sebolt-Leopold
  2. Pfizer Research Technology Center, 620 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

    • Jessie M. English

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Competing interests

Both authors are employees of Pfizer Global R&D and own Pfizer stock/shares.

Editor's note: The author has declared interests in Pfizer, which has co-sponsored this Nature Insight. However all editorial content was commissioned entirely independently of this partnership.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Judith S. Sebolt-Leopold.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04874

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