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Nuclear factor-κB in cancer development and progression

Naturevolume 441pages431436 (2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors and the signalling pathways that activate them are central coordinators of innate and adaptive immune responses. More recently, it has become clear that NF-κB signalling also has a critical role in cancer development and progression. NF-κB provides a mechanistic link between inflammation and cancer, and is a major factor controlling the ability of both pre-neoplastic and malignant cells to resist apoptosis-based tumour-surveillance mechanisms. NF-κB might also regulate tumour angiogenesis and invasiveness, and the signalling pathways that mediate its activation provide attractive targets for new chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic approaches.

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  1. Department of Pharmacology, Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, 92093, California, USA

    • Michael Karin

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