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Regulation of cap-dependent translation by eIF4E inhibitory proteins

Abstract

Eukaryotic messenger RNAs contain a modified guanosine, termed a cap, at their 5′ ends. Translation of mRNAs requires the binding of an initiation factor, eIF4E, to the cap structure. Here, we describe a family of proteins that through a shared sequence regulate cap-dependent translation. The biological importance of this translational regulation is immense, and affects such processes as cell growth, development, oncogenic transformation and perhaps even axon pathfinding and memory consolidation.

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Figure 1: Translational control by eIF4E inhibitory proteins.
Figure 2: Regulation of eIF4E inhibitory proteins.

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Acknowledgements

Work in the laboratory of N.S. was supported by grants from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR), The National Cancer Institute of Canada and The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) International Scholar Program. N.S. is a CIHR Distinguished Scientist and a HHMI International Scholar. Work in the laboratory of J.D.R. was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation.

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Correspondence to Joel D. Richter.

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Richter, J., Sonenberg, N. Regulation of cap-dependent translation by eIF4E inhibitory proteins. Nature 433, 477–480 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03205

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