Review Article | Published:

Mechanisms of gene silencing by double-stranded RNA

Nature volume 431, pages 343349 (16 September 2004) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important regulator of gene expression in many eukaryotes. It triggers different types of gene silencing that are collectively referred to as RNA silencing or RNA interference. A key step in known silencing pathways is the processing of dsRNAs into short RNA duplexes of characteristic size and structure. These short dsRNAs guide RNA silencing by specific and distinct mechanisms. Many components of the RNA silencing machinery still need to be identified and characterized, but a more complete understanding of the process is imminent.

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Acknowledgements

We thank W. Fischle, M. Poy and all members of the Tuschl laboratory for comments on the manuscript. G.M. is supported by an Emmy Noether fellowship of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

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Affiliations

  1. Laboratory of RNA Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, Box 186, New York, New York 10021, USA  ttuschl@rockefeller.edu

    • Gunter Meister
    •  & Thomas Tuschl

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The authors declare competing financial interests: details accompany the paper on http://www.nature.com/nature.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02873

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