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Oncogenomics and the development of new cancer therapies

Abstract

Scientists have sequenced the human genome and identified most of its genes. Now it is time to use these genomic data, and the high-throughput technology developed to generate them, to tackle major health problems such as cancer. To accelerate our understanding of this disease and to produce targeted therapies, further basic mutational and functional genomic information is required. A systematic and coordinated approach, with the results freely available, should speed up progress. This will best be accomplished through an international academic and pharmaceutical oncogenomics initiative.

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Figure 1: Figure 1 Types of target identified through comprehensive genome and transcriptome analysis of cancer cells.
Figure 2: Figure 2 Examples of general drug-screening approaches.
Figure 3

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We thank G. Demetri for discussions and advice during the preparation of this manuscript.

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Strausberg, R., Simpson, A., Old, L. et al. Oncogenomics and the development of new cancer therapies. Nature 429, 469–474 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02627

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