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Control of osteoblast function and regulation of bone mass

Abstract

The skeleton is an efficient 'servo' (feedback-controlled/steady-state) system that continuously integrates signals and responses which sustain its functions of delivering calcium while maintaining strength. In many individuals, bone mass homeostasis starts failing in midlife, leading to bone loss, osteoporosis and debilitating fractures. Recent advances, spearheaded by genetic information, offer the opportunity to stop or reverse this downhill course.

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Figure 1: Determinants of skeletal homeostasis and bone mass.
Figure 2: Leptin signalling pathways.
Figure 3: Transcriptional control of osteoblastic, chondrocytic, adipocytic and myocytic differentiation.
Figure 4: A model for LRP5 signalling pathway in bone.

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We thank C. Hauer and J. Campbell for their assistance with artwork.

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Correspondence to Gideon A. Rodan.

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Harada, Si., Rodan, G. Control of osteoblast function and regulation of bone mass. Nature 423, 349–355 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01660

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