Review Article | Published:

Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

Nature Reviews Materials volume 3, Article number: 17091 (2018) | Download Citation

Abstract

Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell–matrix–growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC–matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin–growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the UK Medical Research Council, the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council for grants MR/L022710/1, EP/P001114/1 and BB/N018419/1, respectively. The authors thank A. Rodrigo-Navarro for the design of the illustrations.

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Affiliations

  1. Centre for Cell Engineering, Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology, University of Glasgow, Joseph Black Building, University Avenue, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.

    • Matthew J. Dalby
  2. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 First Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA.

    • Andrés J. García
  3. Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8LT, UK.

    • Manuel Salmeron-Sanchez

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All authors contributed equally to the preparation of this manuscript.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Matthew J. Dalby or Manuel Salmeron-Sanchez.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/natrevmats.2017.91