Review Article

Towards clinically translatable in vivo nanodiagnostics

  • Nature Reviews Materials 2, Article number: 17014 (2017)
  • doi:10.1038/natrevmats.2017.14
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Abstract

Nanodiagnostics as a field makes use of fundamental advances in nanobiotechnology to diagnose, characterize and manage disease at the molecular scale. As these strategies move closer to routine clinical use, a proper understanding of different imaging modalities, relevant biological systems and physical properties governing nanoscale interactions is necessary to rationally engineer next-generation bionanomaterials. In this Review, we analyse the background physics of several clinically relevant imaging modalities and their associated sensitivity and specificity, provide an overview of the materials currently used for in vivo nanodiagnostics, and assess the progress made towards clinical translation. This work provides a framework for understanding both the impressive progress made thus far in the nanodiagnostics field as well as presenting challenges that must be overcome to obtain widespread clinical adoption.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Award U54CA151459 (Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and Translation). The authors thank the Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation, the Canary Foundation and the Sir Peter Michael Foundation for supporting their research. They thank H. Guo, G. Gold, E. Rosenthal, R. Barth, J. Wu, X. Qin, A. Iagaru, D.-h. Ha, J. Jokerst, B. R. Smith, T. Haywood, A. F. Sabour, E. Robinson and J. Schwimmer for their input.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine.

    • Seung-min Park
    • , Amin Aalipour
    • , Ophir Vermesh
    • , Jung Ho Yu
    •  & Sanjiv S. Gambhir
  2. Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    • Seung-min Park
    • , Amin Aalipour
    • , Ophir Vermesh
    • , Jung Ho Yu
    •  & Sanjiv S. Gambhir
  3. Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3155 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA.

    • Sanjiv S. Gambhir

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The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sanjiv S. Gambhir.