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Identifying fast-onset antidepressants using rodent models

Molecular Psychiatry volume 22, pages 656665 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and a major contributor to the burden of suicide. A major limitation of classical antidepressants is that 2–4 weeks of continuous treatment is required to elicit therapeutic effects, prolonging the period of depression, disability and suicide risk. Therefore, the development of fast-onset antidepressants is crucial. Preclinical identification of fast-onset antidepressants requires animal models that can accurately predict the delay to therapeutic onset. Although several well-validated assay models exist that predict antidepressant potential, few thoroughly tested animal models exist that can detect therapeutic onset. In this review, we discuss and assess the validity of seven rodent models currently used to assess antidepressant onset: olfactory bulbectomy, chronic mild stress, chronic forced swim test, novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH), novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF), social defeat stress, and learned helplessness. We review the effects of classical antidepressants in these models, as well as six treatments that possess fast-onset antidepressant effects in the clinic: electroconvulsive shock therapy, sleep deprivation, ketamine, scopolamine, GLYX-13 and pindolol used in conjunction with classical antidepressants. We also discuss the effects of several compounds that have yet to be tested in humans but have fast-onset antidepressant-like effects in one or more of these antidepressant onset sensitive models. These compounds include selective serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor antagonists, a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, NMDA receptor antagonists, a TREK-1 receptor antagonist, mGluR antagonists and (2R,6R)-HNK. Finally, we provide recommendations for identifying fast-onset antidepressants using rodent behavioral models and molecular approaches.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a IMHRO Rising Star Depression Research Award in Memory of George Largay, and a NARSAD Independent Investigator Award to SD, a NARSAD Young Investigator Award and T32MH020065 to MR, and a generous gift from The Geraldi Norton Foundation.

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  1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA

    • M J Ramaker
    •  & S C Dulawa

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.36

Supplementary Information accompanies the paper on the Molecular Psychiatry website (http://www.nature.com/mp)

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