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Gene expression profiling in AML with normal karyotype can predict mutations for molecular markers and allows novel insights into perturbed biological pathways

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Correspondence to A Kohlmann.

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Competing interests

Microarray study supplies as well as sample preparation and microarray technology training courses were provided by Roche Molecular Systems Inc. (Pleasanton, CA, USA) as part of the AmpliChip Leukemia research program, a collaborative effort with the European LeukemiaNet addressing gene expression signatures in leukemia. Research in this work was further supported in part by COST Action BM0801: European Genomic and Epigenetic Study on MDS and AML and the gene-profiling group (Work package 13) of the European LeukemiaNet. TH is employed by MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory GmbH, has equity ownership of MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory GmbH, and has been a consultant during study conduct for F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland. AK was employed by Roche Molecular Systems Inc., during study conduct and is now employed by MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory GmbH. SS has equity ownership of MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory GmbH. The other authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Kohlmann, A., Bullinger, L., Thiede, C. et al. Gene expression profiling in AML with normal karyotype can predict mutations for molecular markers and allows novel insights into perturbed biological pathways. Leukemia 24, 1216–1220 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1038/leu.2010.73

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