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Israel guidelines for the management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and prevention of kernicterus

Abstract

Despite publication of guidelines for the prevention and management of hyperbilirubinemia in term and late-preterm newborn infants, kernicterus, although rare, continues to occur. Guidelines written for use in one country may not always be universally appropriate. Bearing this in mind, a committee appointed by the Israel Neonatal Society has formulated a set of guidelines, based on those of the American Academy of Pediatrics (2004), but adapted to the realities of the Israeli scene. The guidelines include methods of surveillance of jaundice, prediction of jaundice, assessment of risk factors, discharge planning and post-discharge follow-up, in addition to therapeutic guidelines including indications for phototherapy, exchange transfusion and the use of intravenous immune globulin. Availability of these guidelines to the international community may offer direction to physicians of other countries who may be setting up guidelines for use in their own communities.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Cathy Hammerman, MD, Michael S Schimmel, MD and Ruben Bromiker, MD, for their patience in the practical evaluation of these guidelines while they were being formulated, and the members of the Israel Neonatal Departments Directors Forum for their useful comments and suggestions. Cathy Hammerman, MD, provided invaluable assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. The following international bilirubin experts reviewed drafts of the guidelines and provided valuable input: M Jeffrey Maisels, MB BCh, David K Stevenson, MD, Vinod K Bhutani, MD, Ann Stark, MD, Jon F Watchko, MD, Thor Hansen, MD, Firmino F Rubaltelli, MD.

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Kaplan, M., Merlob, P. & Regev, R. Israel guidelines for the management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and prevention of kernicterus. J Perinatol 28, 389–397 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/jp.2008.20

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