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Bisphenol A exposure and children’s behavior: A systematic review

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical used to synthesize polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Previous research suggests that exposure to it can alter children’s behavior. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing literature, examining associations between prenatal and childhood BPA exposure and behavior in children up to 12 years of age. We searched electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ERIC), reference lists of included articles, and conference abstracts (American Psychiatric Association, American Academy of Neurology, Pediatric Academic Societies, and International Society of Environmental Epidemiology). We included original studies reporting on the association between prenatal and childhood BPA exposure that measured BPA metabolites in urine and children’s behavioral outcomes. From 2811 citations, 11 articles met our inclusion criteria. Descriptive analyses indicated that prenatal exposure to maternal BPA concentrations were related to higher levels of anxiety, depression, aggression, and hyperactivity in children. BPA exposure in childhood was associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression, hyperactivity, inattention, and conduct problems. Limited observational evidence suggests an association between both prenatal and childhood exposure to BPA and adverse behavioral outcomes in children. Prospective cohort studies are needed to clarify these associations.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (grant number MOP-123535) to DD. ME was the recipient of a studentship funded by this grant. The funding agency had no role in the design and conduct of the study, in the collection, analysis and interpretation of the data, or in the preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Maede Ejaredar.

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Ejaredar, M., Lee, Y., Roberts, D. et al. Bisphenol A exposure and children’s behavior: A systematic review. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 27, 175–183 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/jes.2016.8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/jes.2016.8

Keywords

  • child exposure/health
  • endocrine disruptors
  • neurodevelopment

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