Original Article | Published:

Penicillenols from a deep-sea fungus Aspergillus restrictus inhibit Candida albicans biofilm formation and hyphal growth

The Journal of Antibiotics volume 70, pages 763770 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Penicillenols (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 and C2) were isolated from Aspergillus restrictus DFFSCS006, and could differentially inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate pre-developed biofilms of Candida albicans. Their structure–bioactivity relationships suggested that the saturation of hydrocarbon chain at C-8, R-configuration of C-5 and trans-configuration of the double bond between C-5 and C-6 of pyrrolidine-2,4-dione unit were important for their anti-biofilm activities. Penicillenols A2 and B1 slowed the hyphal growth and suppressed the transcripts of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4. Moreover, penicillenols A2 and B1 were found to act synergistically with amphotericin B against C. albicans biofilm formation.

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Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Strategic Leading Special Science and Technology Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA100304002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (41376160, 81673326, 31600060, and 41606100), National Marine Public Welfare Research Project of China (201305017), Regional Innovation Demonstration Project of Guangdong Province Marine Economic Development (GD2012-D01-002) and Guangzhou Science and Technology Research Projects (201607010305). We thank Professor Sang Jianli in Beijing Normal University for generously providing C. albicans SC5314.

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Affiliations

  1. Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Marine Material Medical, RNAM Center for Marine Microbiology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China

    • Jie Wang
    • , Qi-Feng Yao
    • , Muhammad Amin
    • , Xu-Hua Nong
    • , Xiao-Yong Zhang
    •  & Shu-Hua Qi
  2. South China Sea Bio-Resource Exploitation and Utilization Collaborative Innovation Center, Guangzhou, China

    • Shu-Hua Qi

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to Shu-Hua Qi.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ja.2017.45

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