Review Article

Microbial metabolites and derivatives targeted at inflammation and bone diseases therapy: chemistry, biological activity and pharmacology

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Dedication: We are pleased to dedicate this review article to late Professor Hamao Umezawa for his 103 birth years, 31 years after death and a devoted special issue in 2018. He was a pioneer in the field of antibiotic chemotherapy. He was awarded a number of prizes including Japanese Academy award and Paul Ehrlich prize, and many honors including the Japanese Order of Culture and Légion d’honneur. We are deeply grateful for his achievements still giving a number of study guidance to us.

Abstract

Microbial metabolites have attracted increasing interest as a source of therapeutics and as probes for biological mechanisms. New microbial metabolites and derivatives targeted at inflammation and bone disease therapy have been identified by focusing on prostaglandin release, osteoblast differentiation and immune cell functions. These modulators of inflammatory processes and bone disease contribute to our understanding of biological mechanisms and support identification of the therapeutic potential of drug lead candidates. The present review describes recent advances in the chemistry and analysis of inhibitors of prostaglandin release or other functional molecules of immune cells, as well as inducers of osteoblast differentiation, including biological and pharmacological activities.

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Acknowledgements

We are deeply indebted to Professor M Shibasaki and Dr M Kawada for valuable discussions. We thank all past and present co-workers whose names were cited in references for their valued and enthusiastic contributions. We are grateful to Drs I Momose and N Hosokawa, and Ms F Kojima for biological studies; Dr R Sawa and Ms Y Kubota for structure determination; and Drs M Igarashi and M Hatano for microbial resources.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Institute of Microbial Chemistry (BIKAKEN), Numazu Branch, Shizuoka, Japan

    • Hayamitsu Adachi
    •  & Shuichi Sakamoto
  2. Institute of Microbial Chemistry (BIKAKEN), Tokyo, Japan

    • Koichi Nakae
    • , Chisato Nosaka
    • , Sonoko Atsumi
    •  & Yoshio Nishimura
  3. Jobu University, Gunma, Japan

    • Masabumi Shibuya
  4. Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan

    • Nobuaki Higashi
  5. SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

    • Motowo Nakajima
  6. Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

    • Tatsuro Irimura

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Hayamitsu Adachi or Yoshio Nishimura.