Review Article

New antituberculous drugs derived from natural products: current perspectives and issues in antituberculous drug development

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Revised:
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This article is dedicated to Professor Hamao Umezawa in honor of his profound contributions to basic science and the improvement of human health.

Abstract

Tuberculosis is one of the most common and challenging infectious diseases worldwide. Especially, the lack of effective chemotherapeutic drugs for tuberculosis/human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and prevalence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis remain to be serious clinical problems. Development of new drugs is a potential solution to fight tuberculosis. In this decade, the development status of new antituberculous drugs has been greatly advanced by the leading role of international organizations such as the Global Alliance for Tuberculosis Drug Development, Stop Tuberculosis Partnership and Global Health Innovative Technology Fund. In this review, we introduce the development status of new drugs for tuberculosis, focusing on those derived from natural products.

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Affiliations

  1. Institute of Microbial Chemistry (BIKAKEN), Tokyo, Japan

    • Masayuki Igarashi
    • , Yoshimasa Ishizaki
    •  & Yoshiaki Takahashi

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to Masayuki Igarashi.