Review Article

Current landscape and future prospects of antiviral drugs derived from microbial products

  • The Journal of Antibiotics volume 71, pages 4552 (2018)
  • doi:10.1038/ja.2017.115
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Abstract

Viral infections are a major global health threat. Over the last 50 years, significant efforts have been devoted to the development of antiviral drugs and great success has been achieved for some viruses. However, other virus infections, such as epidemic influenza, still spread globally and new threats continue to arise from emerging and re-emerging viruses and drug-resistant viruses. In this review, the contributions of microbial products isolated in Institute of Microbial Chemistry for antiviral research are summarized. In addition, the current state of development of antiviral drugs that target influenza virus and hepatitis B virus, and the future prospects for antivirals from natural products are described and discussed.

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Acknowledgements

We thank all members and alumni of IMC, particularly Dr Akio Nomoto.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry (BIKAKEN), Tokyo, Japan

    • Naoki Takizawa
    •  & Manabu Yamasaki

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The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Naoki Takizawa or Manabu Yamasaki.