Original Article | Published:

Streptomyces lactacystinicus sp. nov. and Streptomyces cyslabdanicus sp. nov., producing lactacystin and cyslabdan, respectively

The Journal of Antibiotics volume 68, pages 322327 (2015) | Download Citation

Subjects

  • A Corrigendum to this article was published on 27 November 2015
  • A Corrigendum to this article was published on 05 January 2017

Abstract

Actinomycete strains OM-6519T and K04–0144T produce the bioactive compounds lactacystin and cyslabdan, respectively. Here, the taxonomic positions of these two strains were determined. The morphological and chemical features of strains OM-6519T and K04–0144T indicated that they belonged to the genus Streptomyces. Strain OM-6519T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Streptomyces xanthocidicus NBRC 13469T (99.7%), Streptomyces chrysomallus subsp. fumigatus NBRC 15394T (99.6%) and Streptomyces aburaviensis NRRL B-2218T (99.5%). However, the DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain OM-6519T and the three related strains were below 70%. Strain K04–0144T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Streptomyces corchorusii NBRC 13032T (99.4%), Streptomyces olivaceoviridis NBRC 15394T (99.4%) and Streptomyces canarius NRRL B-2218T (99.3%). However, the DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain K04–0144T and the three related strains were also below 70%. Based on morphological, cultural and physiological characteristics and DNA–DNA relatedness data, strains OM-6519T and K04–0144T should be classified as new species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the names Streptomyces lactacystinicus sp. nov. and Streptomyces cyslabdanicus sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain of S. lactacystinicus is OM-6519T (=NBRC 110082T, DSM 43136T). The type strain of S. cyslabdanicus is K04–0144T (=NBRC 110081T, DSM 42135T).

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Professor Jean P. Euzéby (Society for Systematic and Veterinary Bacteriology) for his help with the nomenclature.

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Affiliations

  1. Graduate School of Infection Control Sciences, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan

    • Akira Také
    • , Atsuko Matsumoto
    •  & Yōko Takahashi
  2. Kitasato Institute for Life Sciences, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan

    • Atsuko Matsumoto
    • , Satoshi Ōmura
    •  & Yōko Takahashi

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Correspondence to Atsuko Matsumoto.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ja.2014.162

Supplementary Information accompanies the paper on The Journal of Antibiotics website (http://www.nature.com/ja)