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Association between physical activity energy expenditure and inflammatory markers in sedentary overweight and obese women

Abstract

Objective:

Chronic subclinical inflammation and regular physical activity have opposing relationships to obesity-related metabolic diseases. Yet, the association between chronic inflammation and physical activity has rarely been examined in obese subjects. We examined the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE), total (TEE) and resting energy expenditure (REE) and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) with inflammatory markers in overweight/obese women.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Methods:

The study included 152 overweight/obese postmenopausal women who were sedentary and free of chronic/inflammatory diseases (mean age: 57.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 56.7–58.3) years, body mass index (BMI): 32.5 (95% CI 31.8–33.2) kg m−2). The following parameters were measured: TEE (doubly labeled water), REE (indirect calorimetry), PAEE (as (TEE × 0.90)−REE), VO2peak (ergocycle) and serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), haptoglobin, soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 1 (sTNFR1), interleukin-6, orosomucoid and white blood cells.

Results:

Sedentary women with the highest tertile of PAEE (1276 (1233–1319) kcal day−1) had lower concentrations of hsCRP and haptoglobin than those in the lowest tertile (587 (553–621) kcal day−1) after adjustment for fat mass (P<0.05). Soluble TNFR1 was positively correlated with VO2peak, TEE and REE (P<0.05), and hsCRP and orosomucoid were positively associated with REE (P<0.01), whereas haptoglobin was negatively associated with PAEE (P<0.05). In stepwise regression analyses that examined the concomitant associations of components of energy expenditure with inflammatory markers, PAEE remained the only predictor of hsCRP and haptoglobin (P<0.05), explaining 14 and 5%, respectively, of their variation,whereas REE was the only predictor of orosomucoid (r2=0.05, P=0.02) after adjustment for fat mass. Adding leptin to the regression models results in similar relationships between inflammatory markers and components of energy expenditure.

Conclusion:

PAEE is an independent predictor of hsCRP and haptoglobin in sedentary overweight/obese postmenopausal women free of chronic disease. Our data support the role of physical activity in reducing subclinical inflammation and risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the help of Annie Tardif for technical assistance in the measurement of inflammatory markers. We also thank Beckman-Coulter, France, for the kind gift of antibodies. Finally, we thank Dr Fellahi for her participation on inflammatory markers analysis. This study was supported by grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) New Emerging Team in Obesity (University of Montreal and University of Ottawa, MONET project) and from Genome Canada-Quebec (CAO, Complications Associated with Obesity project). Marie-Eve Lavoie was supported by a scholarship from the Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec (FRSQ). Dr Rabasa-Lhoret was supported by the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ) and holds the chair for clinical research J-A de Sève at IRCM (Montreal Institute for Clinical Research). Éric Doucet is a recipient of the CIHR/Merck-Frosst New Investigator Award, a Canadian Foundation for Innovation New Opportunities Award, and an Early Research Award (Ontario). May Faraj is a recipient of the CIHR New Investigator Award.

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Correspondence to M Faraj.

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Lavoie, ME., Rabasa-Lhoret, R., Doucet, É. et al. Association between physical activity energy expenditure and inflammatory markers in sedentary overweight and obese women. Int J Obes 34, 1387–1395 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.55

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.55

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • hsCRP
  • haptoglobin
  • interleukin-6
  • physical activity energy expenditure
  • women

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