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Trans fatty acids and weight gain

Abstract

Increasing rates of obesity have stimulated research into possible contributing factors, including specific dietary components such as trans fatty acids (TFAs). This review considers the evidence for an association between TFA intake and weight gain. It concludes that there is limited but consistent evidence from epidemiological studies, and from a primate model, that increased TFA consumption may result in a small additional weight gain. Data from a long-term study in a primate model suggest that TFA may have a greater adipogenic effect than cis monounsaturated fatty acids; however, there are currently inadequate mechanistic data to provide a comprehensive and plausible explanation for any such metabolic differences between the types of fatty acids.

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Correspondence to A K Thompson.

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Thompson, A., Minihane, AM. & Williams, C. Trans fatty acids and weight gain. Int J Obes 35, 315–324 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.141

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2010.141

Keywords

  • trans-fatty acids
  • weight gain
  • dietary fat
  • fat distribution
  • fatty acid oxidation
  • weight retention

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