Figure 1 | International Journal of Impotence Research

Figure 1

From: Pathology of benign prostatic hyperplasia

Figure 1

Testosterone (T) diffuses into the prostate epithelial and stromal cell. T can interact directly with the androgen (steroid) receptors bound to the promoter region of androgen-regulated genes. In the stromal cell, a majority of T is converted into dihydrotestosterone (DHT)—a much more potent androgen, which can act in an autocrine manner in the stromal cell or in a paracrine manner by diffusing into epithelial cells in close proximity. DHT produced peripherally, primarily in the skin and liver, can diffuse into the prostate from the circulation and act in a true endocrine manner. In some cases, the basal cell in the prostate may serve as a DHT production site, similar to the stromal cell.1

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