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Antihypertensive effects and mechanisms of chlorogenic acids

Hypertension Research volume 35, pages 370374 (2012) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are potent antioxidants found in certain foods and drinks, most notably in coffee. In recent years, basic and clinical investigations have implied that the consumption of chlorogenic acid can have an anti-hypertension effect. Mechanistically, the metabolites of CGAs attenuate oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species), which leads to the benefit of blood-pressure reduction through improved endothelial function and nitric oxide bioavailability in the arterial vasculature. This review article highlights the physiological and biochemical findings on this subject and highlights some remaining issues that merit further scientific and clinical exploration. In the framework of lifestyle modification for the management of cardiovascular risk factors, the dietary consumption of CGAs may hold promise for providing a non-pharmacological approach for the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Nestle Research Center Beijing, Beijing, China

    • Youyou Zhao
    • , Junkuan Wang
    •  & Weiguo Zhang
  2. Nestle R&D Center Beijing, Beijing, China

    • Olivier Ballevre
    •  & Hongliang Luo

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Weiguo Zhang.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/hr.2011.195

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