Association between Carotid Hemodynamics and Asymptomatic White and Gray Matter Lesions in Patients with Essential Hypertension

Abstract

The aim of this study was to clarify the magnitude of common carotid artery (CCA) structural and hemodynamic parameters on brain white and gray matter lesions in patients with essential hypertension (EHT). The study subjects were 49 EHT patients without a history of previous myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, chronic renal failure, symptomatic cerebrovascular events, or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. All patients underwent brain MRI and ultrasound imaging of the CCA. MRI findings were evaluated by periventricular hyperintensity (PVH), deep and subcortical white matter hyperintensity (DSWMH), and état criblé according to the Japanese Brain dock Guidelines of 2003. Intima media thickness (IMT), and mean diastolic (Vd) and systolic (Vs) velocities were evaluated by carotid ultrasound. The Vd/Vs ratio was further calculated as a relative diastolic flow velocity. The mean IMT and max IMT were positively associated with PVH, DSWMH, and état criblé (mean IMT: ρ=0.473, 0.465, 0.494, p=0.0007, 0.0014, 0.0008, respectively; max IMT: ρ=0.558, 0.443, 0.514, p=0.0001, 0.0024, 0.0004, respectively). Vd/Vs was negatively associated with état criblé (ρ=−0.418, p=0.0038). Carotid structure and hemodynamics are potentially related to asymptomatic lesions in the cerebrum, and might be predictors of future cerebral vascular events in patients with EHT.

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Correspondence to Takafumi Okura.

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Kurata, M., Okura, T., Watanabe, S. et al. Association between Carotid Hemodynamics and Asymptomatic White and Gray Matter Lesions in Patients with Essential Hypertension. Hypertens Res 28, 797–803 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1291/hypres.28.797

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Keywords

  • essential hypertension
  • asymptomatic lesions
  • white matter lesions
  • deep gray matter lesions
  • Doppler ultrasound

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