Review | Published:

Gene therapy research in Asia

Gene Therapy volume 24, pages 572577 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Gene therapy has shown great potential for the treatment of diseases that previously were either untreatable or treatable but not curable with conventional schemes. Recent progress in clinical gene therapy trials has emerged in various severe diseases, including primary immunodeficiencies, leukodystrophies, Leber’s congenital amaurosis, haemophilia, as well as retinal dystrophy. The clinical transformation and industrialization of gene therapy in Asia have been remarkable and continue making steady progress. A total of six gene therapy-based products have been approved worldwide, including two drugs from Asia. This review aims to highlight recent progress in gene therapy clinical trials and discuss the prospects for the future in China and wider Asia.

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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge National Natural Science Foundation of China for funding through project number 81472195.

Author information

Author notes

    • H-X Deng
    •  & Y Wang

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University and Collaborative Innovation Center, Chengdu 610041, China

    • H-X Deng
    • , Y Wang
    •  & Yu-quan Wei
  2. CAS Key Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China

    • Q-r Ding
  3. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences and School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China

    • D-l Li

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to H-X Deng or Yu-quan Wei.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2017.62

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