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Potential treatments for genetic hearing loss in humans: current conundrums

Abstract

Genetic defects are a major cause of hearing loss in newborns. Consequently, hearing loss has a profound negative impact on human daily living. Numerous causative genes for genetic hearing loss have been identified. However, presently, there are no truly curative treatments for this condition. There have been several recent reports on successful treatments in mice using embryonic gene therapy, neonatal gene therapy and neonatal antisense oligonucleotide therapy. Herein, we describe state-of-the-art research on genetic hearing loss treatment through gene therapy and discuss the obstacles to overcome in curative treatments of genetic hearing loss in humans.

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Minoda, R., Miwa, T., Ise, M. et al. Potential treatments for genetic hearing loss in humans: current conundrums. Gene Ther 22, 603–609 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2015.27

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