ACMG Presidential Address | Published:

Is modern genetics the new eugenics?

Genetics in Medicine volume 5, pages 469475 (2003) | Download Citation

The ACMG presidential address was presented March 13, 2003 at the 2003 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting of the American College of Medical Genetics, San Diego, California.

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Acknowledgements

The research for this presentation was performed in part in 2000 while Dr Epstein was a Scholar in Residence at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Study & Conference Center, Bellagio, Italy.

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  1. Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco

    • Charles J Epstein

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Correspondence to Charles J Epstein.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1097/01.GIM.0000093978.77435.17

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