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Identification of differentially expressed miRNAs in alopecia areata that target immune-regulatory pathways

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Acknowledgements

We thank the Locks of Love Foundation for the generous support of this work. We also thank the support from P30AR069632 Columbia University Skin Disease Resource-Based Center (epiCURE) and P50AR070588 Alopecia Areata Center for Research Translation (AACORT) on experimental design and data analysis.

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Correspondence to A M Christiano.

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Wang, E., DeStefano, G., Patel, A. et al. Identification of differentially expressed miRNAs in alopecia areata that target immune-regulatory pathways. Genes Immun 18, 100–104 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/gene.2017.4

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