Letter to the Editor

Do patients with type 2 diabetes still need to eat snacks?

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the project grant IGA MZCR NT/14250-3 from Ministry of Health, Prague, Czech Republic and Institutional Support MZCR 00023001 (IKEM, Prague, Czech Republic).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Diabetes Centre, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic

    • H Kahleova
    • , L Belinova
    •  & T Pelikanova
  2. Department of Steroid Hormones and Proteohormones, Institute of Endocrinology, Prague, Czech Republic

    • M Hill

Authors

  1. Search for H Kahleova in:

  2. Search for L Belinova in:

  3. Search for M Hill in:

  4. Search for T Pelikanova in:

Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to H Kahleova.

Supplementary information

Supplementary Information accompanies this paper on European Journal of Clinical Nutrition website (http://www.nature.com/ejcn)