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Epidemiology

Dietary intakes and food sources of phytoestrogens in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24-hour dietary recall cohort

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Phytoestrogens are estradiol-like natural compounds found in plants that have been associated with protective effects against chronic diseases, including some cancers, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dietary intake of phytoestrogens, identify their food sources and their association with lifestyle factors in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Single 24-hour dietary recalls were collected from 36 037 individuals from 10 European countries, aged 35–74 years using a standardized computerized interview programe (EPIC-Soft). An ad hoc food composition database on phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestans, enterolignans and equol) was compiled using data from available databases, in order to obtain and describe phytoestrogen intakes and their food sources across 27 redefined EPIC centres.

RESULTS:

Mean total phytoestrogen intake was the highest in the UK health-conscious group (24.9 mg/day in men and 21.1 mg/day in women) whereas lowest in Greece (1.3 mg/day) in men and Spain-Granada (1.0 mg/day) in women. Northern European countries had higher intakes than southern countries. The main phytoestrogen contributors were isoflavones in both UK centres and lignans in the other EPIC cohorts. Age, body mass index, educational level, smoking status and physical activity were related to increased intakes of lignans, enterolignans and equol, but not to total phytoestrogen, isoflavone or coumestan intakes. In the UK cohorts, the major food sources of phytoestrogens were soy products. In the other EPIC cohorts the dietary sources were more distributed, among fruits, vegetables, soy products, cereal products, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was a high variability in the dietary intake of total and phytoestrogen subclasses and their food sources across European regions.

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Acknowledgements

This work was carried out with the financial support of the European Commission: Public Health and Consumer Protection Directorate 1993 to 2004; Research Directorate-General 2005; Ligue contre le Cancer, Institut Gustave Roussy, Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM; France); German Federal Ministry of Education and Research; Danish Cancer Society: Health Research Fund (FIS) of the Spanish Ministry of Health (RTICC DR06/0020); the participating regional governments and institutions of Spain; Cancer Research UK; Medical Research Council, UK; the Stroke Association, UK; British Heart Foundation; Department of Health, UK; Food Standards Agency, UK; the Wellcome Trust, UK; the Stavros Niarchos Foundation and the Hellenic Health Foundation; Italian Association for Research on Cancer; Compagnia San Paolo, Italy; Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports; Dutch Ministry of Health; Dutch Prevention Funds; LK Research Funds; Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland); World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF); Swedish Cancer Society; Swedish Scientific Council; Regional Government of Skane, Sweden; Nordforsk - Centre of Excellence programe HELGA; Some authors are partners of ECNIS, a network of excellence of the 6FP of the EC. RZR is thankful for a postdoctoral programe Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria (FIS; no. CD09/00 133) from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation. We thank Raul M. García for developing an application to link the FCDB and the 24-HDR. We would also like to thank Marleen Lentjes, Veronica van Scheltinga, Alison McTaggart and Amit Bhaniani for their invaluable contributions to the creation of the EPIC-Norfolk phytoestrogen database.

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Correspondence to R Zamora-Ros.

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Contributors: RZ-R and CAG designed the research; RZ-R. and VK conducted the research; RZ-R and LL-B performed the statistical analysis; RZ-R wrote the manuscript; all authors read, critically reviewed and approved the final manuscript.

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Zamora-Ros, R., Knaze, V., Luján-Barroso, L. et al. Dietary intakes and food sources of phytoestrogens in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) 24-hour dietary recall cohort. Eur J Clin Nutr 66, 932–941 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.36

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Keywords

  • phytoestrogens
  • intake
  • food sources
  • EPIC-Europe

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