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Trans fatty acids, insulin resistance and diabetes

Abstract

The possible relationship between consumption of trans fatty acids (TFAs) and risk of insulin resistance or development of diabetes mellitus type II has been considered by a number of human and animal studies over the past decade. This review evaluates the evidence, and concludes that there is limited evidence for a weak association at high TFA intakes, but very little convincing evidence that habitual exposure as part of a standard western diet has a significant contribution to risk of diabetes or insulin resistance. The possibility of increased risk for individuals with particular genotypes (such as the FABP2 Thr54 allele) is of interest, but further work would be required to provide sufficient evidence of any association.

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Acknowledgements

We thank the Food Standards Agency (UK) for providing funding. Funding for Update on trans fatty acids and health provided by Food Standards Agency (UK).

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Correspondence to A K Thompson.

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Thompson, A., Minihane, AM. & Williams, C. Trans fatty acids, insulin resistance and diabetes. Eur J Clin Nutr 65, 553–564 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2010.240

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Keywords

  • diabetes
  • insulin
  • insulin resistance
  • insulin sensitivity trans fatty acids
  • trans FA

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