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Beneficial impact on cardiovascular risk profile of water buffalo meat consumption

Abstract

Background/Objectives:

Meat is a good source of proteins and irons, yet its consumption has been associated with unfavorable cardiovascular effects. Whether this applies to all types of meat is unclear. We thus aimed to appraise the impact of water buffalo meat consumption on cardiovascular risk profile with an observational longitudinal study.

Subjects/Methods:

Several important cardiovascular risk features were appraised at baseline and at 12-month follow-up in 300 adult subjects divided in groups: recent consumers of water buffalo meat vs subjects who had never consumed water buffalo meat. In addition, long-standing consumers of water buffalo meat were evaluated.

Results:

Age, gender, height, body weight, and the remaining diet (with the exception of cow meat consumption) were similar across groups. From baseline to follow-up, recent consumers of water buffalo meat change their intake of water buffalo meat from none to 600±107 g per week (P<0.001), with ensuing reductions in cow meat consumption from 504±104 to 4±28 (P<0.001). At the end of the study, recent consumers of water buffalo meat showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol and triglycerides levels, lower pulse wave velocity, as well as a more blunted response to oxidative stress from baseline to follow-up in comparison with subjects who had never consumed water buffalo meat (all P<0.05).

Conclusions:

Consumption of buffalo meat seems to be associated with several beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk profile. Awaiting further randomized clinical trials, this study suggests that a larger consumption of water buffalo meat could confer significant cardiovascular benefits, while continuing to provide a substantial proportion of the recommended daily allowance of protein.

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Correspondence to G Giordano.

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Giordano, G., Guarini, P., Ferrari, P. et al. Beneficial impact on cardiovascular risk profile of water buffalo meat consumption. Eur J Clin Nutr 64, 1000–1006 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2010.108

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2010.108

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • coronary artery disease
  • diet
  • domestic water buffalo
  • meat

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