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The weird physics of levitating liquids and upside-down buoyancy

Liquid can levitate and boats can float upside down in this gravity-defying physics experiment. Researchers in Paris have been investigating the effect of vertical shaking, which can be used to suspend a layer of liquid in mid-air. They have discovered a peculiar phenomenon that allows lightweight objects to float on the bottom surface of this liquid, with a kind of reverse-buoyancy. This counter-intuitive behaviour is a result of the constant vibrations which changes the forces acting on the floating objects.

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-02528-6

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