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Second example reported of a stem-cell transplant in the clinic leading to HIV remission

A person infected with HIV who was treated for blood cancer with a stem-cell transplant has gone into viral remission, with no trace of the virus in their blood. A similar outcome in 2009 hadn’t been replicated until now.
Timothy J. Henrich is in the Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94110, USA.
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Nature 568, 175-176 (2019)

doi: 10.1038/d41586-019-00989-y

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Competing Financial Interests

The author does consulting for Merck and receives grant support from Gilead Biosciences.

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