Review

Deconstructing networks of p53-mediated tumor suppression in vivo

  • Cell Death and Differentiation 25, 93103 (2018)
  • doi:10.1038/cdd.2017.171
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Received:
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Accepted:
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Edited by F Pentimalli

Abstract

The transcription factor p53 is a vital tumor suppressor. Upon activation by diverse stresses including oncogene activation, DNA damage, hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, p53 activates a panoply of target genes and orchestrates numerous downstream responses that suppress tumorigenesis. Although early studies of p53 suggested that its ability to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis programs accounted for its tumor-suppressor activity, more recent studies have challenged this notion. Moreover, p53 regulates a suite of additional processes, such as metabolism, stem cell function, invasion and metastasis. The processes p53 coordinately regulates to enact tumor suppression, and how such regulation occurs, thus remain elusive. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of p53-mediated tumor-suppressive mechanisms gleaned from in vivo studies in mouse models.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Kathryn Bieging-Rolett and Brittany Flowers for critical reading of the manuscript. We apologize to those whose work we could not cite due to spatial constraints.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Division of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Alyssa M Kaiser
    •  & Laura D Attardi
  2. Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Laura D Attardi

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Laura D Attardi.