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Quality of Life

A randomized trial on the effect of a multimodal intervention on physical capacity, functional performance and quality of life in adult patients undergoing allogeneic SCT

Abstract

The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of a 4- to 6-week multimodal program of exercise, relaxation and psychoeducation on physical capacity, functional performance and quality of life (QOL) in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) adult recipients. In all, 42 patients were randomized to a supervised multimodal intervention or to a control group receiving usual care. The primary end point was on aerobic capacity measured in VO2 max. Secondary end points were muscle strength, functional performance, physical activity level, QOL, fatigue, psychological well-being and clinical outcomes. The multimodal intervention had a significant effect on physical capacity: VO2 max (P<0.0001) and muscle strength: chest press (P<0.0001), leg extension (P=0.0003), right elbow flexor (P=0.0009), right knee extensor (P<0.0001) and functional performance (stair test) (0.0008). Moreover, the intervention group showed significantly better results for the severity of diarrhea (P=0.014) and fewer days of total parenteral nutrition (P=0.019). Longitudinal changes in QOL, fatigue and psychological well-being favored the intervention group, but did not reach statistical significance. Assignment of a multimodal intervention during allo-HSCT did not cause untoward events, sustained aerobic capacity and muscle strength and reduced loss of functional performance during hospitalization.

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Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the study participants, the staff and administration at the Department of Hematology and The University Hospitals Center for Nursing and Care Research, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. This research was supported by grants from The Lundbeck Foundation, The Novo Nordic Foundation, The Danish Cancer Society, The Copenhagen Hospital Corporation and The Danish Nursing Society.

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Jarden, M., Baadsgaard, M., Hovgaard, D. et al. A randomized trial on the effect of a multimodal intervention on physical capacity, functional performance and quality of life in adult patients undergoing allogeneic SCT. Bone Marrow Transplant 43, 725–737 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/bmt.2009.27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/bmt.2009.27

Keywords

  • allogeneic SCT
  • exercise
  • physical and functional capacity
  • quality of life
  • multimodal intervention

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