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Ocean circulation drove increase in CO2 uptake

Nature volume 542, pages 169170 (09 February 2017) | Download Citation

The ocean's uptake of carbon dioxide increased during the 2000s. Models reveal that this was driven primarily by weak circulation in the upper ocean, solving a mystery of ocean science. See Letter p.215

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Sara E. Mikaloff Fletcher is at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Greta Point, Wellington 6021, New Zealand.

    • Sara E. Mikaloff Fletcher

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Correspondence to Sara E. Mikaloff Fletcher.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/542169a

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