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Atmospheric science

Ancient air caught by shooting stars

Nature volume 533, pages 184186 (12 May 2016) | Download Citation

Ashes of ancient meteors recovered from a 2.7-billion-year-old lake bed imply that the upper atmosphere was rich in oxygen at a time when all other evidence implies that the atmosphere was oxygen-free. See Letter p.235

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Kevin Zahnle is in the Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Centre, Moffett Field, California 94035-1000, USA.

    • Kevin Zahnle
  2. Roger Buick is in the Department of Earth & Space Sciences, and in the Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1310, USA.

    • Roger Buick

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Kevin Zahnle or Roger Buick.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/533184a

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