News & Views | Published:

Palaeoanthropology

What teeth tell us

Nature volume 530, pages 425426 (25 February 2016) | Download Citation

Models based on developmental mechanisms described in mice and shared by most mammals are shown to accurately predict tooth size in extinct hominins, and can explain the small third molars in our species. See Letter p.477

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature 530, 477–480 (2016).

  2. 2.

    , & Nature 449, 427–432 (2007).

  3. 3.

    & J. Anat. 226, 150–162 (2015).

  4. 4.

    & Evolution 66, 1024–1043 (2012).

  5. 5.

    & Yearb. Phys. Anthropol. 50, 106–132 (2007).

  6. 6.

    et al. Science 344, 1358–1363 (2014).

  7. 7.

    , , , & J. Hum. Evol. 82, 34–50 (2015).

  8. 8.

    & Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 96, 335–356 (1995).

  9. 9.

    , , & Nature Commun. 6, 6690 (2015).

  10. 10.

    & J. Anat. 136, 197–219 (1983).

  11. 11.

    , , , & J. Hum. Evol. 62, 7–58 (2012).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Aida Gómez-Robles is in the Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052, USA.

    • Aida Gómez-Robles

Authors

  1. Search for Aida Gómez-Robles in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Aida Gómez-Robles.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/530425a

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing