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Planetary science

The Moon's tilt for gold

Nature volume 527, pages 455456 (26 November 2015) | Download Citation

The Moon's current orbit is at odds with theories predicting that its early orbit was in Earth's equatorial plane. Simulations now suggest that its orbit was tilted by gravitational interactions with a few large bodies. See Letter p.492

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  1. Robin Canup is in the Planetary Science Directorate, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80302, USA.

    • Robin Canup

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Correspondence to Robin Canup.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/527455a

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