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Climate science: The long future of Antarctic melting

Simulations show that melting of the Antarctic ice sheet in response to climate change could raise the global sea level by up to 3 metres by the year 2300 and continue for thousands of years thereafter. See Letter p.421

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Alexander Robel is in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA, and in the Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago.

    • Alexander Robel

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Correspondence to Alexander Robel.

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