News & Views | Published:

Materials science

Superlattice substitution

Nature volume 524, pages 418419 (27 August 2015) | Download Citation

What happens if some of the particles of a superlattice — an array of identical nanoscale crystals — are replaced with foreign ones? It emerges that the properties of superlattices can be radically altered in this way. See Letter p.450

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature 524, 450–453 (2015).

  2. 2.

    , & Science 270, 1335–1338 (1995).

  3. 3.

    Nano Today 6, 419–437 (2011).

  4. 4.

    , , , & Nature 439, 55–59 (2006).

  5. 5.

    , , , & Nature 396, 444–446 (1998).

  6. 6.

    et al. Nano Lett. 10, 4235–4241 (2010).

  7. 7.

    et al. Science 329, 550–553 (2010).

  8. 8.

    et al. Science 344, 1377–1380 (2014).

  9. 9.

    & ACS Nano 6, 8094–8104 (2012).

  10. 10.

    MRS Bull. 37, 63–71 (2012).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Daniel Vanmaekelbergh is in the Department of Chemistry, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, University of Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CC, the Netherlands.

    • Daniel Vanmaekelbergh

Authors

  1. Search for Daniel Vanmaekelbergh in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Daniel Vanmaekelbergh.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/524418a

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing