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Biodiversity

The benefits of traditional knowledge

Nature volume 518, pages 487488 (26 February 2015) | Download Citation

A study of two Balkan ethnic groups living in close proximity finds that traditional knowledge about local plant resources helps communities to cope with periods of famine, and can promote the conservation of biodiversity.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Manuel Pardo-de-Santayana and Manuel J. Macía are in the Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain.

    • Manuel Pardo-de-Santayana
    •  & Manuel J. Macía

Authors

  1. Search for Manuel Pardo-de-Santayana in:

  2. Search for Manuel J. Macía in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Manuel Pardo-de-Santayana.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/518487a

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