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Science policy

Europe is failing young researchers

We are young European researchers and participants in science-policy initiatives who feel strongly that the European Research Area (ERA) faces many challenges.

The absence of a fully inclusive and self-sufficient ERA still affects research institutions locally. Regional funding remains too sparse and fragmented. As well as a dearth of sustainable career opportunities, there is widespread cronyism, and many administrative and research structures are obsolete.

We need more transparency and objectivity in funding, promotions and hiring practices. Such reforms would cost relatively little and might even make some funding cuts unnecessary.

The responsibility for improvement lies not only with the European governing bodies, but also with member states and regions. These are issues on which the undersigned all agree — we are members of the COST Sci-Generation Network, the Young Academy of Europe, the Global Young Academy and EURAXESS Voice of the Researchers.

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Correspondence to Thomas Schäfer.

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Schäfer, T. Europe is failing young researchers. Nature 516, 170 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/516170b

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