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Brain training

Games to do you good

Nature volume 494, pages 425426 (28 February 2013) | Download Citation

Neuroscientists should help to develop compelling video games that boost brain function and improve well-being, say Daphne Bavelier and Richard J. Davidson.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Daphne Bavelier is in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0268, USA, and the Department of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    • Daphne Bavelier
  2. Richard J. Davidson is at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2280, USA.

    • Richard J. Davidson

Authors

  1. Search for Daphne Bavelier in:

  2. Search for Richard J. Davidson in:

Competing interests

D.B. serves on the advisory board of Akili Interactive Labs.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Daphne Bavelier or Richard J. Davidson.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/494425a

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