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Microbiology

Learning about who we are

Nature volume 486, pages 194195 (14 June 2012) | Download Citation

Microbial inhabitants outnumber our body's own cells by about ten to one. These residents have become the subject of intensive research, which is beginning to elucidate their roles in health and disease. See Articles p.207 & p.215

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. David A. Relman is in the Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA, and at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California.

    • David A. Relman

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Correspondence to David A. Relman.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/486194a

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