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Palaeobotany: In the shade of the oldest forest

The uncovering of a large soil surface preserved under sediment for 390 million years has exposed plant remains which show that the world's earliest forests were much more complex than previously thought. See Letter p.78

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Brigitte Meyer-Berthaud and Anne-Laure Decombeix are at the Unité Mixte de Recherche 'Botanique et bioinformatique de l'architecture des plantes', CNRS-CIRAD, 34398 Montpellier, France.

    • Brigitte Meyer-Berthaud
    •  & Anne-Laure Decombeix

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Brigitte Meyer-Berthaud or Anne-Laure Decombeix.

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