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Antibiotic overuse

Stop the killing of beneficial bacteria

Nature volume 476, pages 393394 (25 August 2011) | Download Citation

Concerns about antibiotics focus on bacterial resistance — but permanent changes to our protective flora could have more serious consequences, says Martin Blaser.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Martin Blaser is chair of the Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York 10016, USA.

    • Martin Blaser

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Correspondence to Martin Blaser.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/476393a

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