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Epidemiology

How common is autism?

Autism spectrum disorders vary greatly in severity. By including children in regular education who received no special help, an epidemiological study has found these disorders to be up to three times more prevalent than thought.

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Figure 1: Kim and colleagues' study2.

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Correspondence to Catherine Lord.

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Competing interests

The author receives royalties from diagnostic instruments that were used in the article reviewed, although not for this use (because these were research translations that are used free of charge). The author donates the royalties from all projects in which she is involved, and also clinics, to a not-for-profit agency, Have Dreams.

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Lord, C. How common is autism?. Nature 474, 166–167 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/474166a

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