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Catching the first fish

Nature volume 402, pages 2122 (04 November 1999) | Download Citation

Subjects

Most major animal groups appear suddenly in the fossil record 550 million years ago, but vertebrates have been absent from this ‘Big Bang’ of life. Two fish-like animals from Early Cambrian rocks now fill this gap.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Philippe Janvier is at the Laboratoire de Paléontologie (UMR 8569 du CNRS), Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 8 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France.

    • Philippe Janvier

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/46909

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